7 Wonders of the Womb

7 Wonders of the Womb: Discover the Powers of the Amazing Uterus

GUEST BLOG By Kara Maria Ananda

Emma-Plunkett-art-Uterus-15-67-1024x1024

Women’s bodies hold within them an incredible organ filled with sexual and creative power.

It is time that we celebrate the astonishing capabilities and mysteries of the fantastic uterus!

Every single human being that has ever been alive upon this planet, now and throughout all of history, has achieved this existence thanks to this very organ.

Thus, we have all been intimately acquainted with the uterus, since the dawn of our lives, whether or not you have one personally within your own body.

However, the uterus is an endangered organ. Hysterectomy (the removal of the uterus) is currently the #2 most common surgery performed in the United States. The #1 most common surgery in the US today is Cesarean Section, the cutting of the uterus to remove a baby.

The uterus is sensitive and permeable to the industrial chemicals now inundating our environment. Hundreds of toxic chemicals are now finding their way into the wombs of women, and thus into the amniotic fluid of pregnant mothers and detectable in the blood of newborns.

It’s important to raise awareness today about the power, purpose and potential of the amazing uterus, so we can focus more energy on the health, vitality and preservation of this amazing female organ.

#1: The Uterus is Super Strong

The uterus is the strongest muscle in the body by weight. The uterus has multiple layers of muscle tissue that run in every direction, spiral together, and are ultra-strong. A laboring uterus exerts incredible pressure to push a baby out into the world, and is the strongest force exerted by any muscle in the body.

The Guinness Book of World Records lists the jaw muscle as the strongest muscle in the body due to a biting contest that measured pressure, but that’s just because people haven’t thought up a good way to make measuring the power of a women’s uterus in labor into a contest. Some people don’t value the uterus as the strongest muscle because not everyone has them (ahem, men) but that doesn’t mean it’s not still the strongest. We know what’s up. Womb power, that’s what.

#2: The Uterus is Incredibly Flexible

A uterus is stretchier than Gumby! During pregnancy a women’s uterus goes from being the size of a pear and tucked behind the pubic bone, to being as large as a balloon and reaching all the way to the ribcage and stretching the abdomen outwards visibly. Then it shrinks back down after birth. That’s totally amazing! Not only is the uterus super strong but it’s super stretchy too!

#3: The Uterus Heals

Menstrual blood is rich in stem cells which are found to be adaptive within the body to heal a wide variety of diseases. Each month during her fertile years, a woman’s body creates a rich endometrial layer in preparation to grow and nourish a whole new human being. When a baby is not conceived the body releases this extremely valuable and nutritive substance during the menstrual cycle.

The abundance of stem cells in the menstrual blood are being researched to treat a wide variety of conditions from stroke, heart disease, Parkinson’s, Lou Gehrig’s, diabetes, wounds, neurodegenerative diseases and more. Women create the most abundant free source of stem cells during monthly menstrual flows, which is much more ethical to harvest than from cord blood of newborns or from aborted embryos, yet it is slow to catch on because of cultural taboos still surrounding menstruation.

#4: The Uterus is Orgasmic

When a women orgasms, she experiences not just pleasurable and euphoric sensations, but waves of contracting muscles throughout the uterus, as well as the vagina and pelvic floor. The whole uterus has waves of muscular contractions which helps to facilitate the movement of sperm from the vagina into the uterus.

Some women also experience deep pleasure from their wombs during orgasm, and say that relaxing and deepening into the feeling allows a whole body orgasmic release.

#5: The Uterus is Connected to the Universe

A women’s menstrual cycles and stages of life are intrinsically linked to the cycles of the Earth, Moon and Sun. The moon cycle is 29.5 days, and the average woman’s menstrual cycle is 29.5 days. Women who’s cycles are closest to the 29.5 day cycle have higher rates of fertility.

In addition, there are 13 moon cycles in a calendar year, and the average age of menarche (a girl’s first menstruation) is age 13. The average age of menopause is 52, which is also the number of weeks in a year. There are an average of 4 weeks to a women’s menstrual cycle and 4 seasons in a year.

Women’s ancient menstrual calendars consisting of notches carved into bone or stone are said to be some of the earliest forms of calendars known. Women’s wombs hold a powerful connection to the astronomical cycles of the Earth, Sun and Moon.

#6: The Uterus Can Grow a Placenta

The uterus is the only organ that can grow a whole new organ within it. The placenta is absolutely amazing, and is an organ that is grown within the uterus when a woman is pregnant that nourishes and feeds the fetus with exactly what it needs every moment for the entire pregnancy. The placenta connects the mother and baby, through it’s attachment to the uterine wall of the mother and to the baby through the umbilical cord. It’s a physical manifestation of the nurturing of the mother for the child and is released after the birth of the child.

The placenta and umbilical cord have a pattern visible in the arteries that looks like the tree of life and is an ancient symbol of life and vitality. Placentas have been highly honored by cultures around the world since the beginning of humanity. The word “placenta” comes from Old English and actually means “a round flat cake”, and the tradition of honoring our placenta continues today as we celebrate around a birthday cake each year on the anniversary of our birth.

#7: The Uterus Can Grow a HUMAN!

It’s totally mind-boggling but true. Within the womb of a woman it is possible to conceive and gestate a whole new human being! WOW! Every single one of us is here alive on the planet today because we we started life growing within the womb of our mother, and we come from a long-line of ancestors born from the wombs of their mothers.

The first time I ever attended a birth as a doula, I was totally amazed at the power of a woman to birth a baby, and walked around for days in total amazement at every woman I saw, thinking how miraculous it is that women have wombs and that we can grow other humans within us. AMAZING.

Now you know why they called her WONDER Woman! Right?

The Universe Within the Uterus

Women can use the power of our wombs not just to grow babies but to tune into the creative potential of the Universe and birth great ideas, businesses, projects, art and more. The womb is a women’s unique connection to a primal source of creativity and can be used for not just procreation but conscious co-creation with nature and spirit.

Let’s honor and celebrate the wonders of the womb and keep our uteruses healthy and loved!

Many blessings,
Kara Maria Ananda

 

http://karamariaananda.com

Art by Emma Plunket: http://www.missplunkett.tv/tagged/womb-art/

Go Raw – Find Your Primal

let your hair down ~ forget your mask ~ find your primal ~ answer your indigenous

Release Your Raw.

Does your body image, the lumps & bumps, the out of shape, the in-shape-but-not-happy, visible flaws, hair, skin, etc. keep you from getting into water or showing your vulnerabilities? We understand. This is a retreat where we invite you to forget about it and allow yourself to just enjoy. You don’t need makeup or your hair done at this place (it’s also OK if you do want these things).

Breitenbush is a clothing optional retreat center and often there are other retreats happening that have male attendees. We’ve never found it to be a problem—only freeing. The pools are serene, discreet, and separated out into different locations. We suggest bringing a bathrobe and towel. Disrobe, get in, get out, and cover-up. All shapes and sizes take in the healing waters.

Women’s Annual Retreat @ Breitenbush Hot Springs, June 9-12, 2015

Corkscrew Jungle

Release Your Raw.

Ask Suz: Getting Your Hormones Checked

Bonsall CHART EP4aAfter every workshop or presentation I give, I get many women approaching me with intimate questions. I always have at least one woman begin to speak in a low voice (so no one else will hear) about her cycle experience and it is always something that fills my heart with compassion. So many stories out there. All similar, but all unique to each woman.

Yesterday as I headed toward a book reading at the Southern Oregon University book faire, I passed a woman walking slowly. I asked her if she was coming to my presentation. She replied with something like, “Yes, I have to do something. I’m having a real hard time with my hormones. I saw your talk on the schedule and knew I had to come.”

The book reading was only 20 minutes. She stayed in her seat while others left. She was teary. We chatted for quite a while. She said she feels like she is in Week 4, Summer, (The Firewalk) all the time. It’s keeping her from living a fulfilling life and beginning to affect her marriage, even though her husband is as supportive and sweet as he can be. She’s trying to find a job but worried she won’t feel well or keep it together. She’s scared and absolutely exhausted.

First of all, I let her know that indeed, this is not how the cycle is designed to make one feel. Something was up.

She told me she had just started her moon, so she is in Week 1, Fall. This is the resting phase in the 4s4w model. I explained in no uncertain terms that she needs to be sleeping or resting more than ever this week. In her case especially, not resting or practicing self-care is only going to perpetuate the problem.

Secondly, I asked her if she had had her hormones checked lately. She said “No, I can’t afford it.” I advised her to check with Planned Parenthood or other clinic (or our state programs or whatever) to see if this service was available to her (note to self: I should really get clear on what’s available myself for this purpose).

I explained to her that I’m not a hormone doctor. What I do is help women reclaim joy and meaning, creating optimal life experiences by tapping into the primal wisdom of the monthly cycle and aligning with it each week. 4 Seasons in 4 Weeks (4s4w) shows you how your hormones are relevant to your daily experience and the essence of each week can be easily understood, harnessed, and counted upon. It’s incredibly accurate for predicting how you’re going to feel and react.

But if you’re not feeling good most of the time and are weepy, exhausted, and angry, it’s time to go the doctor (preferably a specialist with both West and Eastern medicine training) and get your hormones checked. My guess is that something chemical is off there. I thought perhaps that she is estrogen dominant, which can cause a woman to feel as she describes. As she spoke, she began to sob, and said, “See? I can’t stop doing this!”

4s4w helps women to understand why they are feeling the way they do from week-to-week, how they can draw on the super powers of the phase, and what tools they can bring in each day for balance. It has also been helping women who are irregular to become regular. When you align your mind and daily experiences with what your hormones are doing, you’ll find your clarity, direction, and core power.

But if you are suffering day in and day out with no relief, get yourself to the health practitioner  you see for your female stuff for some tests and protocol advise. Once you get that straightened out, implementing the 4s4w practice will have you feeling on top of the world

Moon Maidens, Mamas, and Mentors

The Best of Mt Shasta 2014

The Best of Mt Shasta 2014

Women all over the globe visualize a world where our maidens enter into womanhood with a kinder and gentler way to walk their female life than those who came before them. The moon offers such a system and many women’s circles have returned to these ancient teachings for guidance.

Using movement, music, and art, this fun and easy workshop will focus on girls 7-13, cycling or not-yet. Author Suzanne Mathis McQueen will guide the maidens (and any big people who would like to attend with them, including dads) through the basics of the four easy-to-understand phases of the monthly hormonal adventure using her 4 Seasons in 4 Weeks practice.

4 Seasons in 4 Weeks is a non-technical and symbolic journey through the 28 days of the female hormonal rhythm, revealing a logical and predictable blueprint that that is easy for anyone to understand and continues beyond menopause. Whether cycling, not-yet cycling, or cycling no-more, the energies and guidance of each week is the same for females of any age. All are encouraged to attend.

Replacing derogatory terms with comfortable and positive language, Suzanne shows how to bring honor back to this amazing female way. She encourages the girls to step forward in taking their rightful place on the planet with their rhythmic wisdom at this time and shows them how to begin tracking by noticing their physical energy each day.

 

Suzanne Mathis McQueen is the author of the 4 Seasons in 4 Weeks book series. Using her easy-to-follow system, she teaches females of all ages how to align with the energies of their own hormonal rhythm to optimize decision-making in health, business, and relationships. Her passion is teaching girls and women, individually or in groups, about their personal visions and gifts, why they must know themselves better, what they deserve, and how they must change the world for the better. She is a mother of three terrific, grown kids and dances Hawaiian hula.

Let’s Talk. Period

Let’s Talk. Period.

A post from http://www.thedailystar.net/lifestyle/lets-talk-period-20824

blog unicef articleIn 2009, a UNICEF report showed that “in countries where menstrual hygiene is considered a taboo, girls going through puberty are typically absent for 20 per cent of the school year”*. Societies across the world still treat menstruation as an unmentionable topic. With so few people willing to broach this subject, most of the information being passed on is based on myths, superstitions and false beliefs. Girls are taught to stay a little afar, especially from religious practices or partaking in public/social events if one is menstruating.
Dealing with menstruation is challenging enough, especially for young girls who are still getting accustomed to the turbulence that is puberty. With limited to no space to talk about menstruation openly, these myths and half-truths are constantly perpetuated, which leads to many women feeling isolated and baffled by what’s happening to their bodies. Not to mention continuation of unhygienic practices leading to severe health problems perpetuated by these myths and half-truths among adolescent girls and women**.

At a social level, increasingly, girls are expected to compete with their male counterparts. Whether it’s in education, sports or their careers, women and girls are breaking down barriers and showing that whatever boys can do, they can do equally well, if not better. This is all being done with period cramps and other discomforts that are well hidden from the public eye.
Women and girls attend school, college and the workplace often without usable toilet facilities; not to mention the non-existent sanitation options for women while travelling long distances or in public transportations such as trains and launches.
With health and social issues directly and indirectly connected to issues of menstruation, we still do not talk about it, address it, and educate our daughters about it.  If every girl gets it and every girl knows about it, why not talk about it?

Let's talk. Period.

Why is it important to talk about periods?
Looking at it from a medical perspective, there are hundreds of health conditions and diseases related to menstruation (the period) and menstrual cycle (the time from the beginning of one period to the next), so dealing with periods in a clean and smart manner is imperative.
It is very important for a woman to have regular periods, especially if she is trying to conceive. During each menstrual cycle, levels of the hormone oestrogen rise, resulting in an egg developing and being released by the ovary (ovulation). The womb lining thickens in preparation for a possible pregnancy.
The egg travels down the fallopian tube and if it meets a sperm and is fertilised, a pregnancy can occur. The egg lives for about 24 hours and if it isn’t fertilised, it will be absorbed into the body.

The lining of the womb will come away and leave the body through the vagina mixed with blood. This is a period.
So by now you should be able to understand that if there are no regular periods, there won’t be regular ovulation and no pregnancy.
If the period doesn’t start by 16 years of age, it’s called “delayed menarche” and needs medical attention. If the period starts and then stops it may be due to stress, extreme weight loss, medications or even conditions such as polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS).
If the period starts on time, but is too heavy or happens too often, it may cause too much blood loss which can eventually lead to anaemia if supplements or adequate nutrition is not given.
Periods may be irregular in the beginning which is normal but it can also be caused by unsuspected pregnancy, PCOS or thyroid problems. Periods can often be painful (the pain can range from mild to severe), due to the uterine muscles contracting to remove the blood, but in few cases this may indicate an underlying disease such as endometriosis, fibroids, pelvic inflammatory diseases, etc.
These are few examples of the diseases related to periods. Maintaining proper hygiene alone can get rid of many complications and infections.

What are the dangers associated with poor hygiene?
It is extremely important that the girls are taught about the importance of hygiene and the potential risks if hygiene is not maintained. The risk of infection is higher than normal during menstruation. A plug of mucus normally found at the mouth of the cervix is dislodged and the cervix opens to allow blood to pass out of the body.
This creates a passage for bacteria to travel back into the uterus and pelvic cavity. In addition, the pH of the vagina is less acidic at this time which can increase the chances of gaining yeast infections such as Thrush (Candidiasis). Some examples of poor hygienic practices include unclean sanitary pads which can cause infection; infrequent change of pads that can cause local skin irritation and rashes; and wiping from back to front, which can lead to bacteria from the bowel to move to the vagina.

Teaching our daughters, helping the future
Parents, guardians, older siblings, especially sisters play a crucial role in teaching girls about their bodies particularly on this important rite of passage.  Girls who were taught about their bodies, menstruation cycles and how to hygienically manage their periods, are found to be more confident, able to participate in school and other social events.
Different girls become women at different ages and the first period can start anytime and anywhere, so it is good to start preparing yourself early on. Once she starts her period explain to her what is happening and slowly answer her why’s and how’s.
Most parents avoid talking about periods because of the uncomfortable topic of sex and reproduction, but these topics can be better handled in a culturally sensitive way if you start preparing yourself to have the “talk”.
Given cultural barriers, sometimes it is easier for an aunt or an older sister/cousin to talk to your daughter. Reaching out to close female confidants will show your daughter that she has a community, a support system. Teach her how to manage her first period, and whom she can go for help with how to use a pad, how often to change it and the importance of maintaining hygiene.
Show her how to dispose used pads. Help her to be prepared for leaks, unexpected irregular period dates and stomach cramps.
Take her shopping. Let her decide what kind of sanitary napkins she wants, and what form of undergarments she might be comfortable using. If she’s uncomfortable shopping with you, give her some space. Instead of giving her a list of dos and don’ts, take her out and celebrate the day. Boost her confidence with some compliments. Let her know that what she’s going through doesn’t have to be scary and that she always has someone to talk to.
If you think you still have questions of your own, remember, as a parent, there is nothing wrong in admitting that you don’t have answers to everything.  Mothers please remember that realities of today’s girl children are far different from what you had experienced during your adolescence.  If you are unsure about any topic related to menstruation (irregularity, cramps, sanitary napkins and feminine products, etc.), you can find important and culturally relevant information on the web at sites like Maya.  If you are still unsure, make an appointment with a health professional to have a candid conversation that will be beneficial to both you and your child.
If mum isn’t around, your daughter should be comfortable asking you — the Dads — to get her a packet of sanitary napkin instead of wearing the same dirty one. Braving an uncomfortable moment now can help your daughter from avoiding major medical complications in the future. For her health and happiness, be as supportive as you can, be as open as you can. You will raise a more confident and self-assured woman if you acknowledge her new womanhood in a positive manner.
For more information on menstruation, please visit www.maya.com.bd.  For medical advice, ask your question to our doctors on “Maya Apa Ki Bole”.

Sources:
*http://changeobserver.designobserver.com/media/pdf/unicef_girls.pdf
**http://www.realising-rights.org/docs/monograph_menstruation_BRAC.pdf
By Dr Kazi Mashfia Fardeen, Medical Specialist, maya.com.bd

 

Published: 12:02 am Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Last modified: 1:42 pm Tuesday, April 22, 2014