Summertime

Summertime: It’s all about staying cool.

Staying cool = staying in alignment.
 

The main thing I’ve learned about this summer is that it is hard to get people in the same place at the same time . Everyone is busy going this way and that. It’s not a great time to begin teaching a big course, but good for short, live workshops, so I continue to adjust and go with the rhythm that seems to align best. After all, this is what I teach about natural rhythms, and especially about the “Summer” week, which I call “The Fire Walk”. This is what 4 Seasons in 4 Weeks is about! When we go against the natural flow of energy, we find ourselves stressed out and not knowing why. Better to know what our choices are and how to implement them.

If you’re new to my work or like to have reminders: What I do is demystify the female lunar rhythm (aka, the female cycle) —or her monthly hormonal blueprint—for women, men, and girls (the boys will learn through these other three for now). I have a very specific practice that breaks down the approximate 28 days of the month into 4 guided weeks that I identify with fall, winter, spring, and summer, as well as the moon phases. These 4 phases have different energies to them and tools we can use for them to provide balance and alignment. I’ve discovered that this is a remarkable naviagational system within each woman, that stays even beyond menopause. When women can detect and align with these energies, everything, and I mean everything in her life improves.

Week 4 of the female lunar rhythm identifies with summer because it can feel like the hottest day of the year— the time when people are too hot to be bothered and tempers have short fuses. Sometimes we’d rather just take-on certain tasks on our own.

Just like staying cool in the summer by drinking water or swimming in it, a female needs to know what tools she has available to keep her in comfortable alignment as her body disassembles her uterine lining beneath the surface. The building and taking down of this uterine lining is a radical process! I’m surprised women do as well as they do. When she is mindful of what is actually happening and what she can do about it, with practice, her summer week can go from being hot and irritable to feeling like a nice day at the beach. The book, 4 Seasons in 4 Weeks goes into more depth about this. Upcoming online courses will address this in a richer way.

Blog Tour – A Real Live Writer

My friend and colleague, Lea Bayles, invited me to be a part of a blog tour. How FUN! Her blog was posted last week, and now it’s my turn. Please see her blog here: http://www.leabayles.com/blog.  Thanks, Lea! Beautiful.

Our assignment is to write about our writing life and process. This is a little tricky for me because even though I’m an author, I’ve never really considered myself a writer. My sister, Rose, and our cousin, Violet, were always the writers in the family.

It’s sort of hard to explain what I actually do—what my best gifts are or medicine for the world—which is the heart of the problem when it comes to writing. If I were truly a writer, I would have no problem explaining what I do! Writing is simply the vehicle in which I’m best able to deliver what I see in my head, but it is in no way fast, easy, or necessarily done well. I do, however, immensely enjoy the process of writing anyway. It relaxes and soothes my brain.

Ultimately I suppose, I’m a “messenger of conceptual systems”, which I will be the first to say sounds absurd. I will join you in the loud groan. The truth is though, is that’s the truth.

What it means is that every once in a while I’ll get a large vision that shows me the intricate details of a simple concept that is an easier and healthier version of a system our society currently acts out. It might show up in my head as a vast painting, a diagram or symbol, or an invention, and it will happen in seconds. I’m thinking it is similar to the way composers hear a melody or riff in their head, or how a person with Asperger’s might think in complicated mathematical equations.

What these images do for me is to put things into a much bigger context than what our human population tends to do. I’m thinking the right hemisphere of my brain gets triggered by something my left hemisphere is focused on and goes into super-expansion mode, telescoping out to encompass the entire world and dimensional layers, putting it into a whole different context.

As I’ve gotten older, the presentations in my mind have become stronger and seemingly much more important. In addition to having the system laid before me, I instantly understand specifically how it works, along with the personal and global importance of it. Once in a while there are details to it which seem counter-intuitive, but everything else is so clear that I’ve learned to just be patient and trust that eventually the reason for this anomaly will surface. And it always does.

Anyhow, this is a lot to write down or even put into words (especially when one isn’t a writer).

In the late 1990s, I received two such systems. One was a business system, and the other had to do with women’s power in the world and the societal taboo of the female hormonal cycle. I was shown the hidden secrets of the womb’s guiding sequence.

I first began to write about the business system because, after it came to me, I tried it out on my overly-stressed business. It was easy, fun, and it completely turned the business around! I discovered it worked for relationships as well. As I was writing that book, it was a male friend who would convince me to drop that temporarily to write about the women’s piece, because as a man, he finally understood the rhythmic sex drive of his wife, and the energy of his daughter.

At first it my writing was slow-going. The image in my head spread out in all directions because the female monthly rhythm affects every area of human existence. It ripples out from each woman’s core into society, politics, religion, living conditions, and the environment (so when a culture takes away the right for a woman to manage her own womb, the very thing that she is spiritually and communally responsible for it rips and destroys the fabric of the global community). It was hard to know where to begin writing about it, so I just began at random places. It was hard to have the images come through my fingers effectively. New information would start coming at me rapidly and I couldn’t keep up. The words felt like they were exiting my fingers like molasses.

I knew that to get the book done, I would need to get disciplined.

Once I decided on that, the rest fell into place. I felt I was woken at 3:30-4 every morning with a new batch of info to put into the book, or future books. So I sat up in bed, opened my laptop, and would proceed to document what I could. It would be 7 years before the book, 4 Seasons in 4 Weeks, was published. It’s not a masterpiece of writing—it’s actually a bit rough and raw, sometimes giving too much info and other places not giving enough—but it serves as a vessel for some pretty sacred stuff. My workshops and retreats have begun to polish the work up. It should be luminous by the time it goes to its second printing.

After the book was published, the writing didn’t stop there, nor was that ever the plan. I write every single day. I have a lifetime of offshoots for 4s4w to write (such as the Moon Maiden Manual), as well as the business series and an endless array of right brain telescoping. I’m still very slow, but I still love the process. Most of my mini-musings are posted on Facebook, not even my blog. That’s because I get the most interaction from others there. Interaction gives me energy and makes my writing feel alive. When my writing feels alive, I feel like a real, live writer.

Cheers to the writing process.

Suzanne

Next week on June 30th, please visit the following two women on the blog tour:

Teresa Cisneros

http://mujerinthisworld.blogspot.com/?m=1

I am an Mexican Indian born in U.S. America. I come from farm workers who lived close to the land and I now feel a responsibility to be a leader that empowers women to accept their own powers and assist men in relinquishing it to return to balance. I have a very innate sense of justice and use love as a skill, tool, and practice to walk this transition we find ourselves in. We are all in this together!
Jessica Vineyard

http://www.redletterediting.com/broken/

Jessica Vineyard was born in the wrong century. She should have lived during Queen Elizabeth I’s reign in the latter half of the sixteenth century so she could wear those amazing clothes, travel by carriage, and receive hand-delivered secret messages by knights on horseback. But as a twenty-first century woman, she wears solids, drives a RAV4, and texts multiple times a day. She occasionally tries her hand at writing, but more often she can be found editing other authors’ musings. When she’s not writing or editing, she can be found stargazing, reading historical novels, or playing her guitar.
.

 

 

Memorial Day ~ Honoring the Forgotten Warriors

Today, in addition to honoring all of the military warriors who bravely fought and sacrificed their lives while serving their country throughout time, I would like to honor the mothers, throughout every culture and throughout time, who endured a tortuous labor and died during childbirth. We don’t have a holiday to honor these everyday female warriors who shed their own blood in the taken-for-granted sacrifice to create nurturing circles for all of us and to keep the population of the human race moving forward. Nor do we give out medals, benefits, or any special burial of honor equaling the 21-gun salute.. So here’s to The Fallen, whether by war or womb – our brothers and sisters and ancestors who faced the fire and fought hard.

I honor you.

You are not forgotten.

~ Suzanne

Let’s Talk. Period

Let’s Talk. Period.

A post from http://www.thedailystar.net/lifestyle/lets-talk-period-20824

blog unicef articleIn 2009, a UNICEF report showed that “in countries where menstrual hygiene is considered a taboo, girls going through puberty are typically absent for 20 per cent of the school year”*. Societies across the world still treat menstruation as an unmentionable topic. With so few people willing to broach this subject, most of the information being passed on is based on myths, superstitions and false beliefs. Girls are taught to stay a little afar, especially from religious practices or partaking in public/social events if one is menstruating.
Dealing with menstruation is challenging enough, especially for young girls who are still getting accustomed to the turbulence that is puberty. With limited to no space to talk about menstruation openly, these myths and half-truths are constantly perpetuated, which leads to many women feeling isolated and baffled by what’s happening to their bodies. Not to mention continuation of unhygienic practices leading to severe health problems perpetuated by these myths and half-truths among adolescent girls and women**.

At a social level, increasingly, girls are expected to compete with their male counterparts. Whether it’s in education, sports or their careers, women and girls are breaking down barriers and showing that whatever boys can do, they can do equally well, if not better. This is all being done with period cramps and other discomforts that are well hidden from the public eye.
Women and girls attend school, college and the workplace often without usable toilet facilities; not to mention the non-existent sanitation options for women while travelling long distances or in public transportations such as trains and launches.
With health and social issues directly and indirectly connected to issues of menstruation, we still do not talk about it, address it, and educate our daughters about it.  If every girl gets it and every girl knows about it, why not talk about it?

Let's talk. Period.

Why is it important to talk about periods?
Looking at it from a medical perspective, there are hundreds of health conditions and diseases related to menstruation (the period) and menstrual cycle (the time from the beginning of one period to the next), so dealing with periods in a clean and smart manner is imperative.
It is very important for a woman to have regular periods, especially if she is trying to conceive. During each menstrual cycle, levels of the hormone oestrogen rise, resulting in an egg developing and being released by the ovary (ovulation). The womb lining thickens in preparation for a possible pregnancy.
The egg travels down the fallopian tube and if it meets a sperm and is fertilised, a pregnancy can occur. The egg lives for about 24 hours and if it isn’t fertilised, it will be absorbed into the body.

The lining of the womb will come away and leave the body through the vagina mixed with blood. This is a period.
So by now you should be able to understand that if there are no regular periods, there won’t be regular ovulation and no pregnancy.
If the period doesn’t start by 16 years of age, it’s called “delayed menarche” and needs medical attention. If the period starts and then stops it may be due to stress, extreme weight loss, medications or even conditions such as polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS).
If the period starts on time, but is too heavy or happens too often, it may cause too much blood loss which can eventually lead to anaemia if supplements or adequate nutrition is not given.
Periods may be irregular in the beginning which is normal but it can also be caused by unsuspected pregnancy, PCOS or thyroid problems. Periods can often be painful (the pain can range from mild to severe), due to the uterine muscles contracting to remove the blood, but in few cases this may indicate an underlying disease such as endometriosis, fibroids, pelvic inflammatory diseases, etc.
These are few examples of the diseases related to periods. Maintaining proper hygiene alone can get rid of many complications and infections.

What are the dangers associated with poor hygiene?
It is extremely important that the girls are taught about the importance of hygiene and the potential risks if hygiene is not maintained. The risk of infection is higher than normal during menstruation. A plug of mucus normally found at the mouth of the cervix is dislodged and the cervix opens to allow blood to pass out of the body.
This creates a passage for bacteria to travel back into the uterus and pelvic cavity. In addition, the pH of the vagina is less acidic at this time which can increase the chances of gaining yeast infections such as Thrush (Candidiasis). Some examples of poor hygienic practices include unclean sanitary pads which can cause infection; infrequent change of pads that can cause local skin irritation and rashes; and wiping from back to front, which can lead to bacteria from the bowel to move to the vagina.

Teaching our daughters, helping the future
Parents, guardians, older siblings, especially sisters play a crucial role in teaching girls about their bodies particularly on this important rite of passage.  Girls who were taught about their bodies, menstruation cycles and how to hygienically manage their periods, are found to be more confident, able to participate in school and other social events.
Different girls become women at different ages and the first period can start anytime and anywhere, so it is good to start preparing yourself early on. Once she starts her period explain to her what is happening and slowly answer her why’s and how’s.
Most parents avoid talking about periods because of the uncomfortable topic of sex and reproduction, but these topics can be better handled in a culturally sensitive way if you start preparing yourself to have the “talk”.
Given cultural barriers, sometimes it is easier for an aunt or an older sister/cousin to talk to your daughter. Reaching out to close female confidants will show your daughter that she has a community, a support system. Teach her how to manage her first period, and whom she can go for help with how to use a pad, how often to change it and the importance of maintaining hygiene.
Show her how to dispose used pads. Help her to be prepared for leaks, unexpected irregular period dates and stomach cramps.
Take her shopping. Let her decide what kind of sanitary napkins she wants, and what form of undergarments she might be comfortable using. If she’s uncomfortable shopping with you, give her some space. Instead of giving her a list of dos and don’ts, take her out and celebrate the day. Boost her confidence with some compliments. Let her know that what she’s going through doesn’t have to be scary and that she always has someone to talk to.
If you think you still have questions of your own, remember, as a parent, there is nothing wrong in admitting that you don’t have answers to everything.  Mothers please remember that realities of today’s girl children are far different from what you had experienced during your adolescence.  If you are unsure about any topic related to menstruation (irregularity, cramps, sanitary napkins and feminine products, etc.), you can find important and culturally relevant information on the web at sites like Maya.  If you are still unsure, make an appointment with a health professional to have a candid conversation that will be beneficial to both you and your child.
If mum isn’t around, your daughter should be comfortable asking you — the Dads — to get her a packet of sanitary napkin instead of wearing the same dirty one. Braving an uncomfortable moment now can help your daughter from avoiding major medical complications in the future. For her health and happiness, be as supportive as you can, be as open as you can. You will raise a more confident and self-assured woman if you acknowledge her new womanhood in a positive manner.
For more information on menstruation, please visit www.maya.com.bd.  For medical advice, ask your question to our doctors on “Maya Apa Ki Bole”.

Sources:
*http://changeobserver.designobserver.com/media/pdf/unicef_girls.pdf
**http://www.realising-rights.org/docs/monograph_menstruation_BRAC.pdf
By Dr Kazi Mashfia Fardeen, Medical Specialist, maya.com.bd

 

Published: 12:02 am Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Last modified: 1:42 pm Tuesday, April 22, 2014

A Thief in Summer

Guest post by Jessica Vineyard

I hated it every time it came. It stole in like a thief in the night. A dark cloud of gloom accompanied by a horrid surge of adrenalin. A sinking feeling of dread. A sense that I would never feel like myself again.

I had recently experienced a terribly painful breakup and, while it had been several months prior and I now felt pretty good for the most part, I still experienced a periodic, gripping, gut-wrenching, mind-numbing pain. Perhaps I couldn’t really pin it on the breakup any more.

Then I had the good fortune to read 4 Seasons in 4 Weeks. As I read the bullet points in each seasonal chapter I recognized some of my symptoms. I started tracking immediately. Since I’m way past my physical cycling, I tracked by the Moon phases. In other words, my monthly Day 1 was the day of the New Moon.

It didn’t take long to discover that these times of feeling immense hopelessness, enormous sadness, and the loss of something I could no longer put my finger on came most often during my Summer week, the last week of the Moon’s monthly cycle. I thought I was on to something.

In the beginning, although I was tracking regularly, I didn’t actually look at the monthly rhythms that I was experiencing. More frequently, I found myself having a “gloom attack,” racing to my 4s4w book, and madly skimming through the chapters to find descriptions of my symptoms. It took a while, but I eventually started looking ahead to see what seasonal rhythms were coming. What I discovered astounded me.

Before I describe what I learned, let me say a little more about what I learned when I would look back at what had happened during my cycle. I found that these gloom attacks occurred very predictably—nearly always in my Summer week. When I’d have them, I would feel as though I always felt down and depressed, that I never felt good. So when I did feel good, I didn’t pay attention. I began to spend all my time worrying about the next attack. Weeks would go by, but I knew one was always just around the corner. When the despair descended, I could once again confirm that it happened in week 4. This was getting old. Where was the benefit?

A light came on out of the blue one day. How about looking ahead and putting the 4s4w philosophy to work, girl? Since I knew these attacks came in my Summer week, and I intellectually knew they weren’t indicative of my constant state, I started to bring more of my awareness to the teachings of the other weeks. Week 1: oh, relax? Rest? Right. I’m just crawling out of a hole, for goodness’ sake! Hey, stop fighting it. Just try it. Read the Fall chapter, lady. That’s the point. Oh, right. Okay, fine.

I started to notice that I felt better than good—I felt great!—in Week 2, Winter. I had tons of energy and wanted to move my body. I started to enjoy looking and feeling good. During Week 3, Spring, I made a point of connecting with friends I feel good being around. And by the time the horrible Summer week was upon me, it wasn’t so horrible any more. I still felt the sinking feeling, but instead of fearing the worst, I just allowed myself a few days in bed, quiet and alone, with a good book, a cup of tea, and my phone nearby in case I needed to talk to someone.

And you know what? Those gloom attacks are almost non-existent now. I realize I was feeding them by not caring for myself the rest of the month. Now, when I have a particularly fabulous day and I haven’t been tracking for a while, I’ll whip out my Moon calendar and my 4s4w book and confirm the best instead of the worst. Hey! No wonder I feel my very best today! It’s the Full Moon!

You are More than Your Cycle and Your Cycle is More than Your Period

By 4s4w Lover and Guest Blogger, Sheri Croy
Fall-low-res (2)Chances are, if you were raised in the modern Western world you’ve been conditioned to think of your female cycle at three distinct moments: the moment you have an emotional, passionate, irritable or angry response that someone else deems unreasonable for the circumstance; the moment you see blood, and the moment you don’t see it when it’s expected. Even if you have been raised in a family with a more human centered, body-conscious, healthy view of being a woman, if you are reading this, chances are you’ve been at least witness to the larger Western societal paradigm that has demonized the period — and women with it. If you’ve ever been asked “Where are you in your cycle?” In response to sharing your opinion or stating your feelings, you’ve experienced the demonization first hand. If you’ve ever posed that question to another, or discounted your own feelings and experiences as “PMSing,” you’re (at least a little) conditioned.

What our evolving Western society has done a very good job of with their pills and potions, perfumes and protocols over the last few decades is compartmentalizing the period. Women’s cycles have come to be addressed in terms of PMS and periods — with a focus on the inconvenience, mess and expense of “handling the problem.” Society’s evolution from a family and community centric model in which grandmothers, mothers, aunties and wise women handed down their wisdom to their daughters, nieces and valued young girls is all but lost for the majority of women today. I can sum up what my mother shared with me about my cycle in just a few words, “There are paper towels in the kitchen, just use those.” And when my little sister asked questions I needed my mom to help me answer, her response was, “Your sister can learn about it at school, just like you did.”

I’m not upset about these beginnings; I have tried to do things differently with my daughters — probably to the other extreme (maybe things will even out once I have granddaughters!) In my mom’s case, maybe there was a stigma about discussing “it” with me and my sister. Perhaps my mother had never heard it from her mother. Maybe she was bought in to the cultural idea that your cycle really is nothing more than an inconvenient show of blood once monthly interspersed with some cramping and a few mood swings. Perhaps she was just embarrassed. Or, maybe she just didn’t have anything nice to say, so she chose nothing at all.

The single thing that has made the biggest difference for me — not only in being able to have something nice to say about my cycle — but also having something to hand down to my daughters and help them rise above the stigma and demonization they are plummeted with hundreds of times daily through media, peers and even just interacting with other humans has been the new understanding that my “period” is only one aspect of a vital, dynamic, recirculating cycle. The 4 Seasons in 4 Weeks insights have facilitated such a refreshing and smooth transition for me in thinking and being, I wish I’d had access to this wisdom when I was emerging into womanhood, or at the very least when my girls were younger and I first noticed their mood cycling.

Had I known then, as a young mother, what I know now, I would have known that the predictable moods and behaviors I was seeing acted out in my 5 and 7 year old daughters were just their female blueprints coming into view. I would have been able to guide them better to find times that felt good for talking about the big things affecting their hearts and other times for the big things affecting their minds. I would have been able to show them there are some times that are ideal for playing with our friends and other times that we need to be by ourselves a bit. I would have been able to talk to them about the prime time for building relationships with all their important people and how that time can affect the entire rest of their lives. I would have been able to help them attune to their little bodies and recognize the times for resting and being still and the times for exuberant activity. I could have helped them better to identify the times that felt right for reading, writing or drawing as well as the times that felt right for tackling a big, important project or performing some great feat. I could have done all this in the context of the four seasons.

Even the smallest child can observe the changes in the seasons. The chill of autumn sending us to our cozy jammies and blankets to observe the leaves turning red and falling to the ground; the way the world becomes more quiet under the weight of the sky, the way the plants turn in to the earth, pushing their roots down to prepare for winter. The way winter sends us indoors to play and connect with our families, to snuggle close and watch movies or play games or do crafts activities; the feasts and family celebrations that define our holiday celebrations; the slow building of the light after the winter solstice and the way tiny green shoots appear signaling the approach of spring. The arrival of spring with its lengthening days and bursts of color, birds singing, flowers blooming, rosy cheeks and laughter, the return of shirt-sleeves weather and the joy of spinning and spinning in the sun or rolling down grassy hills. And summer, with its hot, sticky don’t-touch-me, she’s-breathing-my-air days, grass that’s browning with too little water and too harsh of sunlight, flowers in need of dead-heading, and all around, too-hot-for-too-long uncomfortableness. Mother Nature’s seasons, so easy to observe and interact with in my little girls’ lives would have been so easy to translate to their own miniature rhythms, their personal 4 Seasons in 4 Weeks, just as they have been for mine as an adult.

I am finding it easier and easier to navigate my own ebbs and flows, to recognize Week 1, Fall as a time for inward focus, for drawing, writing, resting and recouping; to feel the pull of Week 2, Winter to strengthen my relationships with my spouse, my children, my friends and coworkers, and have the deep heart-to-heart talks at a time when I am closest to my own heart-truth and ability to express myself; to embrace the burgeoning fullness of Week 3, Spring, to acknowledge my inner and outer beauty and allow myself a few indulgences with my partner, to allow my world leader to step forward and offer my truth on the mind-to-mind level; and to steal myself for Week 4, Summer, to face the personal hot-spots head on, to take note of the areas in my life that are breathing-my-air this too-hot week. Instead of pushing off my emotions and passions as a symptom of “PMS,” I’m seeing them through the lens of my pre-menstrual truth telling — journaling and processing in anticipation of releasing what no longer serves me, and taking note of the things I will need to bring up later in my heart-to-heart talks. There is an ease to this way of being, a flow. And every month, every cycle it becomes a little more a part of me. My own rhythm is revealing itself in the most beautiful and powerful way. I’m glad to be finding it now, even at 40, it’s making all the difference for me.

4s4w Week 1, Fall, artwork by Cecile Miranda, 2012

 

Rape Culture and More

by Suzanne Mathis McQueen

Monday, November 18, 2013, I’ll be speaking at the Southern Oregon University Fem Fest at 4:45 pm. The title of my talk with be: The Missing Link: The Lost Language of the Female Way, based on the work I do with 4 Seasons in 4 Weeks and evolving, sacred feminism.

At 7 pm, Melissa McEwan will deliver the keynote. She is the author of this outstanding essay on Rape Culture. It’s difficult to find any better description anywhere and I encourage you to read this piece.

Fem Fest 2013

This day long, interactive event involving workshops, presentations and performances delivered by campus and community members, will celebrate and explore intersectional feminist practice, research, activism and creativity. The intention is to create a space where people of diverse identities, with a wide range of interests and passions will be able to explore how feminisms connect to their personal, academic or professional lives.

 

 

 

 

 

Are You Cliterate?

http://sacredfeminist.blogspot.com/ by Suzanne Mathis McQueen

Are you Cliterate?

I consider her to be a most important rediscovery.

Her name is “clitoris”, a hugely important pleasure treasure who’s holistic intelligence, secrets, SIZE, and potential for saving one’s sanity has been cruelly banished and kept out for way too long. Along with the female cycle and the VaJayJay, she is yet another locked-away, buried, code of female conduct and function which is finally being unearthed by one interesting author, artist, or everyday woman-after-another in the ongoing effort to reveal the authentic and powerful female—one’s true state of being. 

Sure, anyone who knows anything at all about lovemaking knows to touch, lubricate, rub, massage, lick, or suck the clit. Sometimes it leads to orgasm and sometimes it doesn’t. Certainly and thankfully there are lovers out there who have it going on in this regard, but it’s more than this. We women want more information and sexual equality. We are very interested in knowing exactly how big that thing inside of us is and the role it plays in not only pleasure and orgasm, but bringing respect and happiness back into the lives of women globally. 

In her Ted Talk, Nicole Daedone let’s us know that orgasm through clit attention is the Cure for Hunger in the Western Woman. Mary Roach tells us 10 Things We Didn’t Know About Orgasm. Mara Altman goes on a vision quest for the Big O. 

And now artist, Sophia Wallace, is getting visual.  She wants you to be Cliterate.

The Clitoris’s true potential is not only rarely utilized or focused on, but there seems to be an equal amount of derogatory excuses of why it just isn’t worth the bother, which in turn, tells us that pleasuring women in life is not worth the bother. Worse though, are cultural and societal attitudes and  practices that eliminate the clit altogether in order to eliminate the pleasure of the woman altogether in order to control her behavior altogether. Metaphorically, the elimination of the clitoris can be experienced all around us where women are sexually portrayed virtually everywhere in the media to sell almost every thing, but are ultimately, personally de-feminized in their equal entitlement to sexual pleasure. 

Even though the mostly hidden clitoris is often longer than a not-erect penis, it doesn’t take a genius to note the societal preference given to making sure men are sexually satiated because they “need it” and the presumption that women don’t really care about sex all that much. Take Las Vegas for example (or any other place in the world for that matter). It’s easy for men to buy sexual release and touch if they need it (whether it’s low or high end prostitution), but if you’re a woman? Forget it. The general population believes women would never do such a thing and that we have no such needs. It’s not only ridiculous, but it keeps women feeling lonely, sexually frustrated, not valued, and untouchable. Physically, psychologically, emotionally, or metaphorically, it’s all cruelty toward women and violence against them no matter which way you look at it. And this is what Sophia Wallace is speaking the truth about with her Cliteracy project..

The Clitoris. It’s not enough to know you have one. Claiming Your Clit is yet one more important step to claiming and integrating your female sexuality into your entire holistic and authentic self and knowing what you deserve. 

We’ve only begun, in recent years, talking about the clitoris, orgasm, the female cycle, menopause, and the vagina. Next up: I want to see the world discover a treasured, sacred feminine recipe for reliable contraception, or see created, a form of the birth control pill that is actually good for the female and keeps her hormonal rhythm in tact. For the same reasons these other sexually focused features were excluded from importance and power, finding holistically good-for-the-woman contraception through ancient wisdom or current super science is not coming along quickly.  I know it is out there, but I think unfortunately, it will first take believing that women deserve sovereignty over their female bodies and lives before sincere action will be taken.

“Reproduction really translates to sex and creation. Both can be sacred, and both can be exploited. Both are controversial,and so are women because of them.” ~ 4 Seasons in 4 Weeks: Awakening the Power, Wisdom, and Beauty in Every Woman’s Nature, page xxii

* Huff Post Women, August 2013,

 

Women Need It and So Do the Men Who Love Them

It was super, super hot and dusty at the Peace Village Festival in my hometown of Ashland, Oregon where I had a vendor booth, selling and signing 4 Seasons in 4 Weeks. It’s August, after all, and we’ve had horrible fires that created horrible, socked-in smoky air. But the powers-that-be gave me a terrific space close enough to a huge willow that I received lovely and regular breezes from and a bit of shade. Under this beautiful tree I set up the ancient healing bowl that I am the Keeper of, with water from the hot springs of the land, and instructions for individuals who walked up to the bowl to do their own private water ritual. I loved that. It was all perfect.

Because this was a music festival with a ton of vendor booths, I couldn’t just kick back in the booth and wait for people to come to me. I took my infamous clipboard to the dirt path to gather email addresses of interested parties and ask women this: “Do you track your cycle and do you have any interest in knowing more about the wisdom of its blueprint?”, For the guys, “Are you in a relationship and would you like to know more about how a woman’s sex drive works by knowing more about her cycle?”

You’d think those questions (and me with a clipboard) would make people run. I was shocked at how quickly these mostly-young people engaged. The topic was right there in the forefront of the women’s minds and they had no problem launching right into their cycle woes. I heard the same story over and over again, only with different details. I discovered that the biggest problem the women face these days is the irregularity of their cycle due to former birth control pill usage, yet we all agreed that reliable contraception is crucial for preventing unwanted pregnancy. My answer is always the same: Try getting the physical cycle on track by first getting it on track mentally. Hence, the 4 Seasons in 4 Weeks approach. With the banners I had encircled the inside of the canopy with, I would visually show them the way to wrap their minds around their cycles in a more positive, enlightened, and cohesive way.

I showed them how the guidance of the female cycle blueprint would not only tell them when they had to rest well (or communicate, connect, lead, or process) in order to have a smoother experience, but it would ask them to look at the choices they are making in regard to romantic partners or bringing forth their authentic gifts. It has them looking at the sacredness of their being and the importance of valuing themselves. The female cycle blueprint helps a woman align with her core power, which ultimately, is the medicine the female gender must offer to heal the planet’s challenges. It’s big stuff.

Talking to people one-on-one over holding a workshop for many was a challenge. However, I enjoyed the general vibe of the festival and this casual setting lent itself to intimate and real discussions with so many people. Hanging-out time allows individuals to have the space to speak from his or her heart more clearly about their vulnerabilities and challenges. I enjoyed the fact that people felt comfortable enough to grab a chair.  It was heartwarming and heartbreaking all at the same time. They seemed hungry to talk with someone about this topic.

The wisdom of the female cycle blueprint is new information for most, even for those who have been tracking their fertility for a long time, as well as the beauties who follow the Goddess traditions and do the Red Tent events and all that. One thing is clear: Women need it and so do the men who love them.  The female cycle blueprint is an internal navigation system for more than just fertility. It’s a sacred and ancient feminine compass for living life fully, optimally, powerfully, and in harmony with the men in our lives and our planet.

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